Emigrating to Australia: what you need to know [infographic]

With good wages, a high standard of living and a laid back culture, Australia is by far the most popular destination for British expats. Here’s what you need to know before making the move Down Under:

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Ready to move to Australia? Pickfords helps thousands of expats emigrate Down Under every year. Get a quote and book your home survey today.

Emigrating to Spain: what you need to know [infographic]

With great food, a laid back culture and, of course, fantastic weather, Spain is one of the most popular destinations for British expats. Whether you’re emigrating for work, retirement, or just a change of scenery, there are a few things to arrange before making the move to Spain:

 

Emigrating to Spain

What paperwork will I need?

Within three months of your arrival, you will need a “Número de Identidad de Extranjero” (‘NIE’) identity card and a “Tarjeta de Residencia” residency card.

An S1 form is vital should you require medical treatment. You will need to sign the “Padró Municipal d’Habitants” register at the local town hall.

When applying for any of the above, make sure you have proof of your previous residence, proof of having ceased residence there, a copy of your work and residence permit, and your passport.

What should I do about finances?

It is best to set up a Spanish bank account and be able to prove how much money you have in your British account. When you come to transfer your assets, Pickfords’ foreign exchange service can help you move your money safely and securely.

You can still receive your British state pension while living in Spain, as long as you inform the  Department of Work and Pensions of your move.

Can I take my pet with me?

Certain pets are allowed in Spain with a European Pet Passport. Appropriately vaccinated and microchipped pets should be able to travel without being placed in quarantine.

Pickfords’ pet shipping service will arrange all the details of your pet’s relocation.

What will happen with my belongings?

Pickfords provides a complete packing and removal service to Spain. We carefully pack your goods in the UK, collect them from your home, transport everything to Spain and arrange delivery and unpacking at your Spanish residence. We also provide goods storage in the UK or Spain if required.


Ready for your move to Spain? Get a quote or book your home survey today.

Moving to Australia: what you need to know

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With good wages and a high standard of living, a laid back atmosphere and of course glorious sunshine and azure ocean views, Australia is frequently touted the best and most popular expat destination.

If you dream of joining over one million Brits in the Lucky Country, following these five tips before you move will help your relocation run smoothly:

Arranging the paperwork

The two most important documents for relocating to Australia are your passport and visa. As with any overseas travel, make sure your passport is valid and up-to-date well before departure. To find an Australian visa you may be eligible for, click here.

Most other paperwork relates to the goods you are importing. You’ll need to complete an Unaccompanied Personal Effects statement (BS534), provide purchase receipts or proof of value for items less than 12 months old and produce a descriptive inventory of your goods.

Should you select Pickfords to pack your personal effects, we will provide assistance with your paperwork, including the completion of your inventory while packing.

 Organising pet travel

If you are considering taking your pet with you to Australia, he or she will need a certified rabies vaccination, rabies blood test (RNATT) and a DEFRA Export Health Certificate issued by an Official Veterinarian (OV). Talking to your vet about fitting your pet with a microchip is also recommended prior to travel.

Take advantage of Pickfords’ pet shipping service and we will arrange all the details of your pet’s relocation for you.

Learning the dialect

While 80% of Aussies speak English, the Australian dialect can be hard to understand for Brits. If words like ‘chook’, ‘neddie’ or ‘dunny’ leave you scratching your head, it’s worth swotting up on “ocker” English to help you get by when talking to locals.

Understanding the culture

As with any new country, you’ll likely experience a number of cultural differences when emigrating to Australia. For example, the temperate-to-tropical climate means that Aussies are often more adventurous and free-spirited due to a love of the outdoors.

Researching Australian culture before you leave the UK will help you integrate into your local community after you arrive.

Transporting your goods

When arranging the transport of your effects to Australia, choosing an experienced removal company with the international expertise is vital to ensure your goods arrive on time, safely and securely. Pickfords transports customers’ belongings to Australia every week, more frequently than any other BAR member. With 40 partner offices across Australia, including Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, Pickfords can transport your goods to any Australian destination.

Click here to find out more about transporting your goods to Australia with Pickfords.

Furry stowaway finds a home

A cat who was discovered in a Pickfords container earlier this year has found a home.

The feline, believed to have been a street cat, had found its way into a shipping container in Limassol, Cyprus, and spent a month on the water on its way to the UK.

The container was unloaded and trucked to Pickfords’ international warehouse in Kempston, Bedfordshire. On opening the container to unload its customers’ goods, the Pickfords warehouse team discovered the tabby.

The cat was not in the best of health when the container was opened, so Pickfords gave her food and water to keep her going. The team called the local Bedford Trading Standards organisation who sent a team to catch the cat, who was then taken into quarantine.

Once given the all-clear from quarantine, she was taken in by Cats Protection Birmingham Adoption Centre. The cat attracted a lot of interest, but being rather shy after her ordeal, went several weeks without being adopted.

Eventually, an elderly couple visited the Centre, saw the stowaway and fell in love. Confident they would be able to coax her out of her shell, they adopted the feline, naming her ‘Miss Pickford’.

Miss Pickford now enjoys the comforts of her new Birmingham home, and is slowly becoming less shy around her owners.

Moving to Germany: what you need to know

With quality healthcare, low unemployment and a focus on cleanliness and organisation, Germany is an increasingly popular destination for many British expats.

If you’re considering relocating to Germany, there are a number of things to arrange before you move:

Arranging the paperwork

British citizens do not require a visa to enter Germany, but you will need a valid British passport. You will also need a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) prior to travel, to ensure you are covered for state-provided healthcare when in Germany.

One you arrive, you’ll need to register for a Certificate or Registration (“Anmeldebestaetigung”) for your residency within seven days, obtained from your local registration office.

Organising pet travel

If you are considering taking your pet with you to Germany, he or she will need a European Pet Passport to travel freely across European borders. The Pet Travel Scheme allows for appropriately vaccinated pets to travel across European countries without being placed in quarantine. Talk to your vet about fitting your pet with a microchip prior to travel. Pickfords’ pet shipping service will arrange all the details of your pet’s relocation.

Learning the language

While 56% of the Germany population speak English, it is normally as a second or third language. Learning at least basic German will prove incredibly helpful when communicating with local residents.

Before you emigrate, you may wish to join a German class at your local adult education centre or community college to gain a basic knowledge and help you communicate effectively in-country.

Understanding the culture

As with any new country, you’ll likely experience a number of cultural differences when emigrating to Germany. For example, Germans have a strong sense of planning and timing, so events and appointments typically start on time and lateness is frowned upon. German people also place importance on cleanliness and tidiness, so expect others to be presentable and have a low tolerance for litter.

German cuisine varies from region to region; a lot of common dishes are similar to the UK, although many meals will incorporate some form of sausage. Beer is well known as the German national drink, although German wine is becoming increasingly popular.

Conducting some research on the culture of your region before you leave the UK will help you integrate into your local community after you arrive.

Transporting your goods

When you come to arranging the transport of your effects to Germany, choosing an experienced removal company with the international expertise is vital to ensure your goods arrive on time, safely and securely. Pickfords transports customers’ belongings to Germany every week, more frequently than any other BAR member. With partner offices in Berlin, Cologne, Frankfurt, Hamburg and Munich, Pickfords can transport your goods to any German destination.

Click here to find out more about transporting your goods to Germany with Pickfords.

Emigrating to Spain: what you need to know

With great food, a wonderful culture and of course, fantastic weather, Spain is understandably among the most popular destinations for British expats.

Whether you’re emigrating for work, retirement or simply a change of scenery, there are a few things to arrange before you make the move:

Paperwork and finances

If you have an EU passport there’s no need to apply for a visa, but you will need a “Número de Identidad de Extranjero” (‘NIE’) identity card within three months of your arrival. You also need to apply for a “Tarjeta de Residencia” (residency card) and to set up a Spanish bank account and be able to prove how much money you have in your bank account in Britain. When you come to transfer your assets, Pickfords’ foreign exchange service can help you move your money safely and securely.

You can still receive your British state pension while living in Spain, as long as you inform the UK’s Department of Work and Pensions of your move.

Another essential is the S1 form, which is vital if you need medical treatment in Spain. If you have this, you will be treated just the same as a Spanish resident, so long as you register your presence at the local town hall on the “Padró Municipal d’Habitants” register.

Pet travel

If you are thinking of taking your pet with you, he or she will need a European Pet Passport to travel freely across European borders. The Pet Travel Scheme allows for appropriately vaccinated pets to travel without being placed in quarantine. Talk with your vet to get your pet fitted with a microchip before it travels. Pickfords’ pet shipping service will arrange all the details of your pet’s relocation.

Learning the local language

It’s a good idea to learn the language of the area you’re moving to. Only 27% of the Spanish population speak English, so even a basic understanding of the local tongue will be incredibly helpful when communicating with local residents. Spanish is of course the official national language, spoke by around 99% of Spaniards as either a first or second language; but other languages, such as Catalan and Galician, are co-official and spoken as a first language in many regions of Spain.

Before you emigrate, you could join a Spanish class in your local adult education centre or community college to gain a basic knowledge and help you communicate effectively in-country.

Understanding the culture

As with any new country, there are a number of cultural differences you’ll likely experience when emigrating to Spain. For example, meal times: Spaniards’ main meal is typically lunch, eaten around 2 – 3pm; dinner is generally between 9 and 10pm. Spanish culture is also incredibly relaxed; people take time over their meals, and children are generally given a greater degree of freedom than in the UK. Doing some research on the local culture before you relocate will help you integrate into your local community after you arrive.

Transporting your goods

When it comes to moving your effects to Spain, choosing an experienced removal company with the international expertise is vital to ensure your goods arrive on time, safely and securely. Pickfords transports customers’ belongings to Spain every week, more than any other BAR member, and with partner offices in Madrid and Barcelona, we can transport your goods to any Spanish destination. Click here to find out more about transporting your goods to Spain with Pickfords.

Pickfords finds furry stowaway

Pickfords discovered a cat in a container earlier this year.

The feline, believed to have been a street cat, had found its way into a shipping container in Limassol, Cyprus, and spent a month on the water on its way to the UK.

A brown and white tabby was discovered in a shipping container from Limassol

A brown and white tabby was discovered in a shipping container from Limassol. Image: Hisashi

The container was carried by the ‘Rio Cadiz’ shipping vessel. The ship and her stowaway travelled from Limassol to Haifa in Israel, then onto Antwerpen in Belgium, then Bremerhaven in Germany before stopping off at Rotterdam and finally arriving in Felixstowe a month after departure.

The container was unloaded and trucked to Pickfords’ international warehouse in Kempston, Bedfordshire. On opening the container to unload its customers’ goods, the Pickfords warehouse team discovered the tabby.

The cat was not in the best of health when the container was opened, so Pickfords gave her food and water to keep her going. The team called the local Bedford Trading Standards organisation who sent a team to catch the cat, who was then taken into quarantine.

The cat was not charged boarding fees for her trip(!)

Update: Furry stowaway finds a home