Office disposal: why landfills are no longer an option [infographic]

Relocating your office often involves disposing of furniture, IT equipment and other materials due for an upgrade at your new facilities. Most businesses will take the opportunity to recycle, although this isn’t always easy. It can be tempting to send tricky composite materials and outdated equipment straight to landfill, but if you don’t do everything possible to avoid traditional disposal, there are significant risks to both the your company and the environment:

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In need of furniture or IT disposal ahead of an office relocation? Pickfords Business Solutions provides a complete recycling and removals service to thousands of UK organisations. Click here to find out more or get a quote today.

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Pickfords golf day raises £3,300 for Cancer Research UK!

Thank you to everyone who sponsored and donated to our charity golf day last week; together we raised over £3,300 for Cancer Research UK!

This year’s event was held at Hanbury Manor Marriott Hotel & Country Club in Hertfordshire, featuring 18 holes across the 7,052 yard course.

Eighteen teams featuring Pickfords employees, clients, partners and suppliers all completed for the coveted 1st place trophy, while individual players bustled for the Nearest the Pin, Longest Drive and Best Player awards.

Click here to visit our Pinterest photo gallery of the event.

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21 more silly British place names

Delivering customer’s belongings nationwide, we’ve noticed that the UK has a lot of strange place names. Last week we listed one for each letter of the alphabet, but it turns out there are plenty of others. Here are 21 more silly British place names:

Beer

A village in Devon. The name is derived from the Old English word “bearu,” meaning “grove,” in reference the the original forestation that surrounded the village.

Catbrain

A small village near Bristol. The name derives from the Middle English “cattes brazaen”, referencing a common type of soil found in the area.

Dog Village

This Devon hamlet may not be associated with Catbrain village, but is twinned with Caterham in Surrey.

Eye

Derived from the Old English word for “island”, the name of this Suffolk market town is also found in Herefordshire and Cambridgeshire.

Flushing

A hygienic village in Cornwall.

Gotham

Derived from the Old English for “goat home”, this Nottinghamshire Village has been referenced in Batman comics as distinct from the caped crusader’s own Gotham City.

Hospital

This Irish town doesn’t actually have a hospital.

Kill

A village in County Kildare, Ireland. Its Irish name is “an Chill”, meaning “the church”.

Lickfold

A hamlet in West Sussex.

Marsh Gibbon

A village in Buckinghamshire. ‘Gibbon’ derives from the family name ‘Gibwen’, belonging to the local lords of the manor in the twelfth century.

Muck

An island in the Inner Hebrides, the smallest of the Small Islands.

New Invention

A commuter village in the West Midlands. Named for the innovative solution to a smoky chimney of the first house erected there; the tenant stuffed it with a hawthorn bush. The settlement shares its name with a hamlet in Shropshire.

Odd Down

A suburb of Bath (which, if you think about it, also has a strange name).

Pity Me

A suburban village of Durham. A popular theory is that Pity Me was named in the 19th century for being considered desolate, exposed or difficult to cultivate.

Shop

A hamlet in Cornwall.

Stepaside

A village in Pembrokeshire. Legend has it the name comes from Oliver Cromwell and his army passing through to Pembroke, demanding that people in his way step aside. There are also Stepasides in Cornwall, Dublin and Powys.

Tubbercurry

Also known as Tobercurry, this County Sligo town derives its name from the Irish ‘Tobar an Choire,’ meaning ‘well of the valley’.

Ugley

This Essex village ain’t got no alibi.

Wallyford

A village in East Lothian.

Westward Ho!

A seaside village near Bideford in Devon, named after the 1855 Charles Kingsley novel.

Yell

THE MAIN SETTLEMENT OF THIS SHETLAND ISLAND IS CALLED ‘MID YELL’.


Pickfords moves customers from Kill, Muck, Shop, and everywhere else on this list, to every postcode across the UK and Ireland. Click here to contact us or get a quote online.

What plug? An expat guide to power outlets [infographic]

When moving abroad, most electricals are compatible between different countries, but only with the right plug. There are a ‘shocking’ number different of sockets, and it’s easy to get confused as to which type you need for your destination country. Stay ‘current’ and find out which adaptor you’ll need with our handy infographic:

Plugs


Ready for your move abroad? Contact Pickfords for expert international packing and removals. Click here for a quote or find out more.

Self-store v long-term storage: what’s best for me?

Personal storage is an increasingly popular service, providing flexibility for homeowners when moving, decorating, or otherwise organising their belongings. So what’s the difference between the two main types of storage, self-store and long-term storage? What’s best for your living situation, and what are the benefits of each?

Self-store

Self storage is designed primarily for smaller volumes of goods needing storage for a short period. This service is ideal if you

  • Need somewhere to store seasonal items, such as Christmas decorations or outdoor furniture
  • Need to keep some furniture and effects out of the way while redecorating
  • Have a small household and need a stop gap during the move process

Self-store gives you the most control over your belongings. You will typically have ownership over your own packing and storage, and self-store facilities are usually very flexible about when you can access your possessions.

Long-term storage

Storage warehouses are designed to keep a large collection of belongings safe for as long as you need them. Long-term storage is perfect if you

  • Have inherited a legacy
  • Are transforming your home into a rental property or Airbnb
  • Have a large household and need a stop gap during the move process
  • Are moving abroad for a fixed period

Companies offering long-term storage will often provide a packing service to ensure professional protection of your items prior to storage. The container used to store your items should also be sealed at your home for security purposes, and transported to the storage centre for you.


Pickfords provides secure goods storage to customers throughout the UK and overseas, and operates self-storage facilities in key locations across the country. Click here to get a quote for storage, or request a call back.

The A-Z of silly British place names

Moving customers across the UK, we’ve discovered that this great county has a lot of odd, silly and just plain funny place names. Sometimes the original Gaelic or Old English sheds some light on them, but for many others, their original meaning is obscure, and we’re left scratching our heads at these bizarre monikers. Here’s our A-Z of some of Britain’s silliest place names:

Auchtermuchty

A town in Fife, from the Gaelic meaning “upland of the pigs”.

Barton in the Beans

A Leicestershire hamlet containing no shops or pubs, only a Baptist church and a postbox.

Curry Mallet

A village in Somerset with a population of 306.

Droop

A North Dorset village in Hazelbury Bryan.

Earcroft

The northern ward of Darwen, Lancashire.

Fakenham

Despite it’s name, a very real market town in Norfolk.

Great Snoring

A rural village in North Norfolk, two miles north of the larger village of Little Snoring.

Heckmondwike

A small town in West Yorkshire.

Ianstown

A village on the Moray Firth. As far as we know, not founded by a bloke called Ian.

Jump

A village on Barnsley, South Yorkshire. According to local legend, it was named after a stream that local miners had to jump over to gain access to the coal mines.

Keith

Another seemingly eponymous Moryan village.

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This Welsh village has the longest place name in Europe. Known as Llanfairpwllgwyngyll for short.

Matching Tye

A village forming part of the civil parish of Matching, Essex. Sadly there’s no neighbouring village called Matching Socks.

Nether Wallop

A village in the Test Valley district of Hampshire

Over Peover

A Cheshire civil parish named after the Peover Eye river on one of the parish boundaries.

Plumpton

There are actually four Plumptons in the UK. Mapped below is a village in East Sussex, but there are also Plumptons in Cumbria, Lancashire and Northamptonshire.

Queen Camel

A village on the River Cam in South Somerset. Some of Queen Camel’s neighbours have equally unusual names, including West Camel, Sparkford and Marston Magna.

Ramsbottom

A market town in Bury, Greater Manchester. The name is believed to derive from the Old English ramm botm, meaning ‘valley of the ram’.

Sheepy

A civil parish in Leicestershire, containing several villages with equally amusing names, including Sheepy Magna, Sheepy Parva, Pinwall and Cross Hands.

Thrumpton

A village in Nottinghamshire.

Upton Snodsbury

A village in Worchestershire.

Vulcan Village

A town in Cheshire whose name predates Star Trek.

Warninglid

A small village in West Sussex, historically known as Warninglyth or Warningeld.

Exning

This Suffolk village technically doesn’t begin with an X, but in our defense the E is silent.

Ystrad Mynach

While strange sounding in English, this Glamorgan town roughly translates to ‘flood-prone valley’ from Welsh. The name was accurate prior to the building of river defences in the 1960s.

Zeals

A village in Wiltshire. The name comes from the Old English sealh, meaning willow.


Pickfords moves customers from Droop, Jump, Sheepy, and everywhere else on this list, to every postcode across the UK and Ireland. Click here to contact us or get a quote online.

‘Pickfords Witches’ get muddy for Cancer Research UK

The self-styled ‘Pickfords Witches of Eastwood’ completed this weekend’s Pretty Muddy event in Derby this weekend, raising over £1,200 for Cancer Research UK!

Well done to Laura Abbey, Amy Chambers, Chantelle Benniston, Charlotte Randall, Georgina Langley and Rachel Walsh from Pickfords’ Nottingham branch for finishing the 5k race on Saturday for Pickfords’ partner charity.

The Derby Pretty Muddy is a large obstacle course over a mixture of terrains, set in 200 acres of parkland within Markeaton Park. As the name suggests, getting muddy is an integral part of the experience!

All funds raised will be donated to Cancer Research UK, supporting research towards the charity’s ultimate goal: bringing forward the day when we beat cancer.